Thank you for your interest in working with the BlueStar team!

If you didn't watch the video at the Virtual SACC please check it out below

MEMORANDUM

From:  Rob Wray, CEO

To:  Potential Candidates from August 2021 SACC

Subject:  A Job Description: OPS OFFICER / ENTREPRENEUR-IN-TRAINING

Date: 3 August 2021

PREAMBLE

This is a somewhat long memo to describe to you what will probably be the most interesting, potentially the most lucrative, and possibly the most frustrating job being presented at this job fair.  We are seeking an ENTREPRENEUR, or someone who wants to learn how to be an entrepreneur.   If you have wanted to run your own business, or to learn how to run a business of your own, this might be a fit for you.

Short form summary:  A 20-person service-disabled-veteran-owned small business outside Washington DC provides telehealth and aging-in-place technologies to hospitals, physicians offices, and direct to consumers.  $2 M in annual revenue, not profitable yet. But we expect to triple in revenue over the next year, and to grow our run-rate ten-fold within 3-4 years. We’re looking for a wicked smart, hard-working, diligent and disciplined jack-of-all-trades to be our Operations Officer / Entrepreneur-in-Training. If you’re good, we’ll want you to be COO within a year.  Conceivably, if you’re REALLY good, you can relieve me as CEO in 3-5 years.  If you have entrepreneurial blood, or want to run your own business someday, this might be for you.

There is no job description for this position, and we have never recruited from the academies before.  This memo will be a feeble effort to get your attention and let you decide if you want to talk further.  Then, if you are, I can send you more info, and we can get on a zoom to discuss in detail.

THE COMPANY

BlueStar TeleHealth is a Delaware C corporation, founded in 2013.  We provide aging-in-place technologies direct to consumers in all 50 states.  We provide telehealth (remote patient monitoring, chronic condition management, etc) to clients such as hospitals, health clinics, and physicians offices.  We operate out of 8000 square feet in an office park in Rockville Maryland.  For a tour of the office:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHfDOwF9NY0

For more info on the company, check out:    www.bluestartelehealth.com

We also provide seniortech at the following site:   www.bluestarseniortech.com

We operate a 501(c)(3) charity for veterans:   www.bluestarseniorveterans.org

We built this site for caregivers:   www.bluestarcaregivers.org

We raised some investment in December and used this video:  https://youtu.be/dyw3zY0mz2k

We are veteran owned and operated. 

  • CEO and COO are both retired two-star Navy admirals.
  • Certified by the Veterans Administration and three national certifying authorities as a service-disabled-veteran-owned business.
  • 15 generals and admirals of all services on our advisory board, all led by an undersecretary of defense.
  • 40+ admirals and generals as shareholders, including six former presidential appointees (including two Secretaries of the Navy).
  • Operating a foundation to provide support to elderly veterans and their spouses/widows.

YOUR POTENTIAL BOSS/MENTOR (ME)

I come from a military family.  In my immediate family (dad, father in law, uncles, brothers, brothers-in-law, kids and kids-in-law), 19 have been in uniform:  6 Army, 6 Navy, 4 USAF, 3 USMC.   I was USNA 79; Dad was USMA 55; my brothers were USMA 80 and 84.  That’s why we gave BlueStar a military flavor.

After USNA I spent my 20’s driving nuclear surface ships.  Shifting to the reserves around age 30 (we were starting to have kids), I spent my 30’s and 40’s in business, but also in the Navy reserve.  After Baghdad in 2004, I got promoted to admiral, put back on active duty, and spent my 50’s back in the Navy full-time.  After retiring from that, we started BlueStar.  My bio is enclosed as Appendix A.

Wikipedia bio:  edia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_O._Wray

Navy bio:  https://www.navy.mil/Leadership/Biographies/BioDisplay/Article/2345244/rear-admiral-robert-o-wray-jr/

Before BlueStar I had a speaking business:    www.saltwaterleadership.com

THE JOB

The job is primarily operational, and runs the gamut of everything a small business has to do to survive and grow.  It includes, but is not limited to:   finance, accounting, sales, marketing, logistics, healthcare, customer service, technology, and corporate governance.  You don’t have to know any of that, but you will be exposed to it.  An entrepreneur sees an opportunity, and builds and operates a business to exploit that opportunity.  That’s what we’re doing in telehealth.

What we do:

  • We do sales and marketing to get clients like hospitals to sign up for our services.
  • We onboard those clients—we develop the processes and systems to enable them to provide telehealth services to their patients. This is mostly operational project management and program management stuff—checklists, regular drum-beats of meetings, paperwork, identifying issues and fixing them. 
  • Once the client is onboarded, we service their patients, using software, hardware, nurse monitoring, and back-office support. This is a daily effort.  This is a well-established, steady-state process. 
  • Those are the three major cylinders of the engine: sales/marketing, client onboarding, and patient services. 
  • In the process, because we are small, you’ll be immersed in all the other facets of a corporate business. Corporate compliance.  Board meetings.  Finance and capitalization, with both equity and debt.  Legal stuff.     Web and cloud stuff. HR.  Accounting. Sales and Marketing.  Tech systems.  You won’t have to know how to do that most of that, but you will be exposed to it, and can learn as much of it as you wish.
  • Our goal: grow from $2 M/year to $20 M/year in revenue over the next 3 years, and sell the company for $100 M+.

As far as the nuts and bolts,

  • We work from 0830 to 1730 Monday through Friday.
  • We all have laptops and do e-mail in the evenings and on weekends, as needed.
  • Business casual.
  • At the start, your desk will be a 4 foot folding table from Home Depot, and if we like you you’ll move up to a 6 footer, and after you’ve been here a while, we’ll give you an 8 footer.
  • We have free parking, free water, free A/C, free office supplies, and free coffee.

COMPENSATION

We are a startup that is still not cash-flow positive.  Therefore, we live a lean life, and don’t pay much.  Our management team all makes about $60k/year.  Most of us have retirement income, or a working spouse, or the temporary ability to get paid less than what we could make elsewhere.

We offer a 401(k) with matching funds; we offer all the normal paid holidays, and an additional 2-3 weeks a year of paid time off.

We offer incentive stock options.  That’s why our management team works for what they could make elsewhere in industry.[1]  If the company does what we hope it will do, those could make you a millionaire in several years.  If the company doesn’t, those options will be suitable for framing but otherwise worthless.

It’s the life of an entrepreneur—doing without corporate perks and benefits and big salaries now, in the hopes of hitting the big payday when the company grows.  Or, with the understanding that this is an apprenticeship in how to start and run a business.

WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR

We’re looking for someone in mid career (mid 20’s to mid 40’s) who wants to learn how to run a business, and who wants to be a big part of a small team.  We’re looking less for specific job experience, than for capacity to be great in a new position. 

Required capabilities:

  • The ability to write well and clearly.
  • The ability to speak well, including potentially selling to clients on the phone. (This isn’t a sales job, but we want to be able to put you on the phone or zoom with the COO of a hospital, and not have you embarrass us.)
  • Likability—the ability to work on a team—if you’re a jerk, we don’t want you
  • The ability to multi-task—you will always be juggling several balls in the air
  • Discipline to focus on priorities. This also involves the ability to compartmentalize.
  • Project management capabilities—the ability to generate a list of what needs to be done, along with a schedule and budget and team, and to get that thing done
  • The ability to be in our office in Rockville from 0830 to 1730 Monday through Fridays, reliably, routinely. This is not a remote position.  If your family situation prevents you from being here every day, this might not be a fit for you.
  • The ability to periodically shoot the breeze about sports. The specific sport is up to you, but if the Nationals or the Redskins make the playoffs and you don’t know that, several of us will look at you sorta funny.
  • A basic understanding of business. Hopefully at one point in your life you had a business, or were exposed to one.  (If you don’t have this understanding, you will quickly gain it.)
  • Fluency in the basic Microsoft suite: word, excel, powerpoint.
  • Stick-to-it-iveness.  Dedication to the mission.  As Mark Cuban and the folks on Shark Tank will tell you, entrepreneurship is a full-contact sport, and not for the faint of heart.

PROS AND CONS

There are a number of cons to this job:

  • The base salary is probably less than you’ll make elsewhere.
  • No international travel, and very little US travel. (This might be a pro for you.)
  • Like any startup, there is a non-zero possibility that we’ll go out of business within the next three years, and you’ll be out of a job. (However, we’ve now been around 6 years, so the chances of that happening now are very small.)
  • We are a small organization and so you won’t learn the machinations of working up the corporate ladder within a huge outfit like IBM or Lockheed Martin or General Dynamics.

There are a number of pros to this job:

  • If the company meets its targets, you’ll make more over the next 3-5 years than you would ever make in any regular salaried job.
  • You will be exposed to every facet of growing and executing a business. You’ll get on-the-job training in excess of any MBA.
  • When you’re done, you’ll know how to run your own business.
  • Potential to become COO and CEO.   I’m 64 and I want to get out of here in 3 years if possible.
  • Mentor/mentee relationship. You’ll be working for two gnarly and experienced two-stars who can help you to continue to develop as a human and as a business person, if you want.
  • Informal business environment, casual dress, folding tables, corn hole, etc.
  • Veteran-oriented company. Vets like you quickly fit in with our karma and camaraderie.

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED

  • Send me an e-mail (robert.wray@bluestartelehealth.com), telling me why I should spend 30 minutes on a zoom with you.
  • Send me your resume or CV

Appendix A:  Wray bio

A Mechanical Engineer from the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Wray spent seven years of active duty as a nuclear engineer on Navy surface ships, carriers, and submarines.  Transferring to the reserves, he enjoyed a varied 20-year career in business as a serial entrepreneur, running companies in manufacturing, hospitality, technology, consulting, and construction. During this period, he invented an electrical device, had it patented, and then built a company to manufacture and sell it into the commercial industry market.  The company later became Energy-Online, and was sold to Pace Global Energy, which was in turn acquired by Siemens.  Later, Wray was manager for a 300-person division of Science Applications International Corporation (NYSE: SAIC). He was brought in to turn around a division whose revenues were dropping 20% annually.  Over three years, he arrested the losses and brought the division back to 20% growth; as a result, he was recognized as one of the top 50 employees among the 47,000 employees of SAIC at the time.

During this time, Wray continued his service in the Navy reserve, and was promoted to Captain in 2000.  In 2004, he was mobilized to the Pentagon and to Baghdad, where he was awarded the Bronze Star for meritorious service while under enemy fire.  In 2007 he was promoted to Admiral and placed back onto full-time active duty for six years, where, among other positions, he led a $3.5 billion (revenue) profit-and-loss organization with 10,000 employees.  He was also Vice Commander of all US Navy forces in Europe and Africa.  He retired in November of 2013 as a two-star Admiral, moved back to Washington DC to start BlueStar.

He has a Masters from Georgetown University’s school of business, a degree from the Naval War College, is a licensed professional engineer, holds a patent, has written two books, and is a frequent professional speaker on leadership and management.  He is an adjunct professor on the faculty of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences at Walter Reed in Washington.  He was Vice-Chairman of the Board of Vinson Hall, which is the Navy/Marine Corps/Coast Guard’s continuing care retirement center (CCRC) in Washington, a $30M (rev) organization caring for some 500 residents.  He is the President Emeritus of The Flag and General Officers Network, a 501.c.19 War Veterans Organization.

He and his wife Maryellen have 6 children, 4 kids-in-law, and 8 grandchildren.  His interests include sailing, reading history, playing the piano, the Red Sox, and avoiding yard work.

[1] I like to think that they are here because they like the job, and the team, and the mission.  But the options are important.

MEMORANDUM

From:  Rob Wray, CEO

To:  Potential Candidates from August 2021 SACC

Subject:  A Job Description: OPS OFFICER / ENTREPRENEUR-IN-TRAINING

Date: 3 August 2021

PREAMBLE

This is a somewhat long memo to describe to you what will probably be the most interesting, potentially the most lucrative, and possibly the most frustrating job being presented at this job fair.  We are seeking an ENTREPRENEUR, or someone who wants to learn how to be an entrepreneur.   If you have wanted to run your own business, or to learn how to run a business of your own, this might be a fit for you.

Short form summary:  A 20-person service-disabled-veteran-owned small business outside Washington DC provides telehealth and aging-in-place technologies to hospitals, physicians offices, and direct to consumers.  $2 M in annual revenue, not profitable yet. But we expect to triple in revenue over the next year, and to grow our run-rate ten-fold within 3-4 years. We’re looking for a wicked smart, hard-working, diligent and disciplined jack-of-all-trades to be our Operations Officer / Entrepreneur-in-Training. If you’re good, we’ll want you to be COO within a year.  Conceivably, if you’re REALLY good, you can relieve me as CEO in 3-5 years.  If you have entrepreneurial blood, or want to run your own business someday, this might be for you.

There is no job description for this position, and we have never recruited from the academies before.  This memo will be a feeble effort to get your attention and let you decide if you want to talk further.  Then, if you are, I can send you more info, and we can get on a zoom to discuss in detail.

THE COMPANY

BlueStar TeleHealth is a Delaware C corporation, founded in 2013.  We provide aging-in-place technologies direct to consumers in all 50 states.  We provide telehealth (remote patient monitoring, chronic condition management, etc) to clients such as hospitals, health clinics, and physicians offices.  We operate out of 8000 square feet in an office park in Rockville Maryland.  For a tour of the office:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHfDOwF9NY0

For more info on the company, check out:    www.bluestartelehealth.com

We also provide seniortech at the following site:   www.bluestarseniortech.com

We operate a 501(c)(3) charity for veterans:   www.bluestarseniorveterans.org

We built this site for caregivers:   www.bluestarcaregivers.org

We raised some investment in December and used this video:  https://youtu.be/dyw3zY0mz2k

We are veteran owned and operated. 

  • CEO and COO are both retired two-star Navy admirals.
  • Certified by the Veterans Administration and three national certifying authorities as a service-disabled-veteran-owned business.
  • 15 generals and admirals of all services on our advisory board, all led by an undersecretary of defense.
  • 40+ admirals and generals as shareholders, including six former presidential appointees (including two Secretaries of the Navy).
  • Operating a foundation to provide support to elderly veterans and their spouses/widows.

YOUR POTENTIAL BOSS/MENTOR (ME)

I come from a military family.  In my immediate family (dad, father in law, uncles, brothers, brothers-in-law, kids and kids-in-law), 19 have been in uniform:  6 Army, 6 Navy, 4 USAF, 3 USMC.   I was USNA 79; Dad was USMA 55; my brothers were USMA 80 and 84.  That’s why we gave BlueStar a military flavor.

After USNA I spent my 20’s driving nuclear surface ships.  Shifting to the reserves around age 30 (we were starting to have kids), I spent my 30’s and 40’s in business, but also in the Navy reserve.  After Baghdad in 2004, I got promoted to admiral, put back on active duty, and spent my 50’s back in the Navy full-time.  After retiring from that, we started BlueStar.  My bio is enclosed as Appendix A.

Wikipedia bio:  edia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_O._Wray

Navy bio:  https://www.navy.mil/Leadership/Biographies/BioDisplay/Article/2345244/rear-admiral-robert-o-wray-jr/

Before BlueStar I had a speaking business:    www.saltwaterleadership.com

THE JOB

The job is primarily operational, and runs the gamut of everything a small business has to do to survive and grow.  It includes, but is not limited to:   finance, accounting, sales, marketing, logistics, healthcare, customer service, technology, and corporate governance.  You don’t have to know any of that, but you will be exposed to it.  An entrepreneur sees an opportunity, and builds and operates a business to exploit that opportunity.  That’s what we’re doing in telehealth.

What we do:

  • We do sales and marketing to get clients like hospitals to sign up for our services.
  • We onboard those clients—we develop the processes and systems to enable them to provide telehealth services to their patients. This is mostly operational project management and program management stuff—checklists, regular drum-beats of meetings, paperwork, identifying issues and fixing them. 
  • Once the client is onboarded, we service their patients, using software, hardware, nurse monitoring, and back-office support. This is a daily effort.  This is a well-established, steady-state process. 
  • Those are the three major cylinders of the engine: sales/marketing, client onboarding, and patient services. 
  • In the process, because we are small, you’ll be immersed in all the other facets of a corporate business. Corporate compliance.  Board meetings.  Finance and capitalization, with both equity and debt.  Legal stuff.     Web and cloud stuff. HR.  Accounting. Sales and Marketing.  Tech systems.  You won’t have to know how to do that most of that, but you will be exposed to it, and can learn as much of it as you wish.
  • Our goal: grow from $2 M/year to $20 M/year in revenue over the next 3 years, and sell the company for $100 M+.

 

As far as the nuts and bolts,

  • We work from 0830 to 1730 Monday through Friday.
  • We all have laptops and do e-mail in the evenings and on weekends, as needed.
  • Business casual.
  • At the start, your desk will be a 4 foot folding table from Home Depot, and if we like you you’ll move up to a 6 footer, and after you’ve been here a while, we’ll give you an 8 footer.
  • We have free parking, free water, free A/C, free office supplies, and free coffee.

 

COMPENSATION

We are a startup that is still not cash-flow positive.  Therefore, we live a lean life, and don’t pay much.  Our management team all makes about $60k/year.  Most of us have retirement income, or a working spouse, or the temporary ability to get paid less than what we could make elsewhere.

We offer a 401(k) with matching funds; we offer all the normal paid holidays, and an additional 2-3 weeks a year of paid time off.

We offer incentive stock options.  That’s why our management team works for what they could make elsewhere in industry.[1]  If the company does what we hope it will do, those could make you a millionaire in several years.  If the company doesn’t, those options will be suitable for framing but otherwise worthless.

It’s the life of an entrepreneur—doing without corporate perks and benefits and big salaries now, in the hopes of hitting the big payday when the company grows.  Or, with the understanding that this is an apprenticeship in how to start and run a business.

 

WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR

We’re looking for someone in mid career (mid 20’s to mid 40’s) who wants to learn how to run a business, and who wants to be a big part of a small team.  We’re looking less for specific job experience, than for capacity to be great in a new position. 

Required capabilities:

  • The ability to write well and clearly.
  • The ability to speak well, including potentially selling to clients on the phone. (This isn’t a sales job, but we want to be able to put you on the phone or zoom with the COO of a hospital, and not have you embarrass us.)
  • Likability—the ability to work on a team—if you’re a jerk, we don’t want you
  • The ability to multi-task—you will always be juggling several balls in the air
  • Discipline to focus on priorities. This also involves the ability to compartmentalize.
  • Project management capabilities—the ability to generate a list of what needs to be done, along with a schedule and budget and team, and to get that thing done
  • The ability to be in our office in Rockville from 0830 to 1730 Monday through Fridays, reliably, routinely. This is not a remote position.  If your family situation prevents you from being here every day, this might not be a fit for you.
  • The ability to periodically shoot the breeze about sports. The specific sport is up to you, but if the Nationals or the Redskins make the playoffs and you don’t know that, several of us will look at you sorta funny.
  • A basic understanding of business. Hopefully at one point in your life you had a business, or were exposed to one.  (If you don’t have this understanding, you will quickly gain it.)
  • Fluency in the basic Microsoft suite: word, excel, powerpoint.
  • Stick-to-it-iveness.  Dedication to the mission.  As Mark Cuban and the folks on Shark Tank will tell you, entrepreneurship is a full-contact sport, and not for the faint of heart.

 

PROS AND CONS

There are a number of cons to this job:

  • The base salary is probably less than you’ll make elsewhere.
  • No international travel, and very little US travel. (This might be a pro for you.)
  • Like any startup, there is a non-zero possibility that we’ll go out of business within the next three years, and you’ll be out of a job. (However, we’ve now been around 6 years, so the chances of that happening now are very small.)
  • We are a small organization and so you won’t learn the machinations of working up the corporate ladder within a huge outfit like IBM or Lockheed Martin or General Dynamics.

There are a number of pros to this job:

  • If the company meets its targets, you’ll make more over the next 3-5 years than you would ever make in any regular salaried job.
  • You will be exposed to every facet of growing and executing a business. You’ll get on-the-job training in excess of any MBA.
  • When you’re done, you’ll know how to run your own business.
  • Potential to become COO and CEO.   I’m 64 and I want to get out of here in 3 years if possible.
  • Mentor/mentee relationship. You’ll be working for two gnarly and experienced two-stars who can help you to continue to develop as a human and as a business person, if you want.
  • Informal business environment, casual dress, folding tables, corn hole, etc.
  • Veteran-oriented company. Vets like you quickly fit in with our karma and camaraderie.

 

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED

  • Send me an e-mail (robert.wray@bluestartelehealth.com), telling me why I should spend 30 minutes on a zoom with you.
  • Send me your resume or CV

 

Appendix A:  Wray bio

A Mechanical Engineer from the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Wray spent seven years of active duty as a nuclear engineer on Navy surface ships, carriers, and submarines.  Transferring to the reserves, he enjoyed a varied 20-year career in business as a serial entrepreneur, running companies in manufacturing, hospitality, technology, consulting, and construction. During this period, he invented an electrical device, had it patented, and then built a company to manufacture and sell it into the commercial industry market.  The company later became Energy-Online, and was sold to Pace Global Energy, which was in turn acquired by Siemens.  Later, Wray was manager for a 300-person division of Science Applications International Corporation (NYSE: SAIC). He was brought in to turn around a division whose revenues were dropping 20% annually.  Over three years, he arrested the losses and brought the division back to 20% growth; as a result, he was recognized as one of the top 50 employees among the 47,000 employees of SAIC at the time.

During this time, Wray continued his service in the Navy reserve, and was promoted to Captain in 2000.  In 2004, he was mobilized to the Pentagon and to Baghdad, where he was awarded the Bronze Star for meritorious service while under enemy fire.  In 2007 he was promoted to Admiral and placed back onto full-time active duty for six years, where, among other positions, he led a $3.5 billion (revenue) profit-and-loss organization with 10,000 employees.  He was also Vice Commander of all US Navy forces in Europe and Africa.  He retired in November of 2013 as a two-star Admiral, moved back to Washington DC to start BlueStar.

He has a Masters from Georgetown University’s school of business, a degree from the Naval War College, is a licensed professional engineer, holds a patent, has written two books, and is a frequent professional speaker on leadership and management.  He is an adjunct professor on the faculty of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences at Walter Reed in Washington.  He was Vice-Chairman of the Board of Vinson Hall, which is the Navy/Marine Corps/Coast Guard’s continuing care retirement center (CCRC) in Washington, a $30M (rev) organization caring for some 500 residents.  He is the President Emeritus of The Flag and General Officers Network, a 501.c.19 War Veterans Organization.

He and his wife Maryellen have 6 children, 4 kids-in-law, and 8 grandchildren.  His interests include sailing, reading history, playing the piano, the Red Sox, and avoiding yard work.

[1] I like to think that they are here because they like the job, and the team, and the mission.  But the options are important.

We raised some money recently and used the video below

Take a video tour of our office in Rockville, Maryland